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Honolulu Eats Part 5: The French Fry Review

In Hawaii on June 25, 2009 at 5:53 am
My husband was overwhelmed by the size of his order at Alan Wong's Pineapple Room. Unfortunately, he was underwhelmed by the fries.

My husband was overwhelmed by the size of his order at Alan Wong's Pineapple Room. Unfortunately, he was underwhelmed by the fries.

I’m not sure how, but somehow my husband managed to eat french fries every day we were in Honolulu. Here is his review of some of the prospects. His criteria include outside crispiness, good saltiness and big bonus points for delicious and diverse dipping sauces. They ‘re listed best to worst.

Hank’s Haute Dogs: Hand-cut skinny fries, cooked to order with great caramel color and crispy edges. The dipping sauces are the best of all the assortments we tried during the week. The Garlic Aioli was tops, with a smooth creaminess and garlicky tang that had us licking the little dip cup. Curry Ketchup was another great dip choice, with a definite curry twist that was complemented by sweet tomato flavors.

Brasserie Du Vin: Brasserie Du Vin’s fries come in a giant cone, flanked by ketchup and house made mayo. They aren’t exactly Belgian style, no horse-fat frying here. However, they are a medium thickness, with crunchy ends and firm texture. For $2, they are a good value pick on the happy hour menu.

Rumfire: This was a split decision, because while the fries themselves were strikingly similar to the frozen Garlic Fries at Trader Joe’s, the dipping sauces were excellent. My personal favorite was the sambal ketchup, which had a great savory sweetness. The pommeroy mustard aioli was my husband’s preferred dip and was flecked with ground mustard seed. A sticky sweet barbecue sauce rounded out the dip trio, but was too overwhelming for repeat dipping.

The Pineapple Room: Most of the food we have eaten at Alan Wong’s restaurants has thrilled and amazed us, so my husband was eagerly anticipating Wong’s take on his favorite side dish. Sadly, there did not appear to be any Alan Wong “take” on the french fry. The fries that came with his Pineapple Room Original Burger were, in my husband’s words “ pretty similar to Burger King.” They seemed to be the garden  variety frozen fries, with only ketchup available for dipping. Sad, but thank goodness there are lots of other dishes that will keep us loving Alan Wong.

The Mai Tai Bar: Their method appeared to be: 1) open the freezer door, 2) grab the bag of Ore-Ida fries from Costco, 3) deep fry, 4) forget about their presence in the deep fryer, burn them. 5) Groan loudly when the server reminds you they are still waiting for fries, throw away burnt fries and start all over. 6) Toss those puppies on a plate and send them out. Without ketchup or salt. 7) Hope they are drinking a lot of the $9 pitchers so they don’t notice the fries.

Honolulu Eats Part 4: Sweets & Coffee

In Hawaii on June 19, 2009 at 7:15 am
Here's flypnay's husband digging into a shave ice from a church fundraiser we passed by, lychee and melon flavor, with adzuki beans and icea cream waiting in the bottom of that paper cup.

Here's flypnay's husband digging into a shave ice from a church fundraiser we passed by, lychee and melon flavor, with adzuki beans and ice cream waiting in the bottom of that paper cup.Though we didn't make it this trip, Waiola Shave Ice on Kapahulu is easiest Waikiki-accessible spot for good quality shave ice.

Many of Hawaii’s sweets are subtle delights, often playing on the natural sugars in red adzuki beans, coconut, sweet taro and sweet potato and even pumpkin. On the other hand, the islands’ share of Portugese culinary ancestry has also lead to more straightforwardly sweet  treats, like fluffy malassadas coated in cinnamon and sugar. Whatever your preference, if you’re like me and have a physical need for coffee or tea and a sweet at 430p every day, Honolulu definitely won’t leave you wanting.

Island Vintage Coffee: I often find the frozen concoctions at Starbucks overpoweringly sweet and corn syrupy, so I was surprised at how hard I fell for Island Vintage Coffee’s Coconut Kona Frozen Mocha. At first sip, you get a great coconut and macadamia nuttiness, then a great coffee and dark chocolate flavor closes it out. I had this on three separate days, it is the perfect antidote to muggy heat and doesn’t feel like a cold glass of syrup. The Island latte was also delicious, with more of a focus on mingling macadamia, coffee and a hint of caramel flavors.  The Lava Mocha, was sort of like hot chocolate, which you may like, but I prefer more coffee flavor. The best part is that their Royal Hawaiian Shopping center location in Waikiki is a stone’s throw from the Sakura Cake Shop, which has individual-size cakes for $3.95 and a good little pastry case….I just love when things work out like that, don’t you?

Town's more laid-back daytime vibe makes it a great stop for coffee if you are in the Kaimuki area, or nearby UH Manoa.

Town's more laid-back daytime vibe makes it a great stop for coffee if you are in the Kaimuki area, or nearby UH Manoa.

Town: In the evening, Town is a hipster bistro that several locals recommended to us like this: “go because the food is awesome, and just know the service is bad.” With that kind of endorsement, we were ready to skip Town. However, we were happily surprised when we stumbled upon its daytime persona as a coffee bar and light breakfast joint. Locals, both hipsters and non, enjoyed pleasant sunshine on the patio or a scattering of tables around the bar, digging into bowls of polenta with soft eggs floating in the middle spiked with crispy prosciutto, cranberry pecan scones and tall, icy lattes. Zero attitude, good coffee, great place for a respite.

Liliha Bakery: I have been asking for Liliha Coco Puffs since I was a toddler. Besides some recent modernizing of the fonts printed on the boxes, not much else has changed; the cream puffs are still filled with chocolate pudding, topped off with a generous dollop of their famous chantilly cream. And of course, the aunties are still behind the counter, to gently urge you to hurry up and decide with a “Yes, My Dear? What else darling?”  Deciding can be tough once you have covered the obvious: coco  puffs and a chantilly cake – layers of chocolate sponge cake and Chantilly cream—to share with the family when you get home. The case is also filled with some good-looking variations on the original puff, including green tea and coffee flavor, as well as a few Filipino pastries and other standards like danishes, muffins, malassadas, etc. I will probably never be able to report on those others; in 25 years of visits to Liliha, I’ve never once changed my order.

It's near impossible to get a pristine photo of Liliha Baked goods once you get them home, they disappear too quickly. At least this way, you get an inside peek at the many layers of chocote cake and buttery-sweet local style chantilly frosting (the frosting recipe is a closely guarded Liliha secret, which makes it taste even better).

It's near impossible to get a pristine photo of Liliha Baked goods once you get them home, they disappear too quickly. At least this way, you get an inside peek at the many layers of chocolate cake and buttery-sweet local style chantilly frosting (the frosting recipe is a closely guarded Liliha secret, which makes it taste even better).

Honolulu Coffee Company:  There are plenty of Honolulu Coffee Company kiosks around Honolulu,  but I enjoy their café in the Moana Surfrider when staying in Waikiki. They brew a nice strong, piping hot drip coffee and when you want something cool, their Iced Nutty Hawaiian Latte lets the coffee flavors show through with a slightly creamy macadamia note running throughout.

Honolulu Eats Part 3: Lunches, Snacks and Bentos, Oh My!

In Hawaii on June 18, 2009 at 6:42 am

Since breakfast and happy hour dinners were such feasts during our recent trip to Honolulu, lunch was often a series of delicious snacks or bentos picked up at various okazu-ya for picnics on the beach. Here are a few highlights from our midday foraging.

Maui Shrimp Chips: This is the greatest snack of all time, easily accessible from ABC stores and groceries in Hawaii ONLY. Keep these, along with a spare bag of boiled peanuts or lychees, on your person at all times.

That's right, face first into the Maui Shrimp Chips. They are that good. Crispy, light, salty and not too much shrimpiness. Sort of like eating fried, crisp air with salt on it.

That's right, face first into the Maui Shrimp Chips. They are that good. Crispy, light, salty and not too much shrimpiness. Sort of like eating fried, crisp air with salt on it.

Tamura’s Fine Wines & Liquor: Normally, we trek out to Tanioka’s in Waipahu for poke, because it is simply the best quality fish we’ve ever had. However, it didn’t meet our criteria of being ridiculously easily accessible from Waikiki without a car, so we tried Tamura’s. This great little grocery has everything you need for a picnic, incuding Nalo greens, Atebara potato chips, a vast selection of wines and a little poke counter tucked into the back. Be warned, the poke guy doesn’t arrive with the goods until sometime between 1030 and noon. The shoyu poke was the best of what we tried, the limu, fishcake and tako poke were showing their age a bit.

Normally, my husband is a devoted burger loyalist. Here he is about to down his second Hank's Haute Dog in under ten minutes.

Normally, my husband is a devoted burger loyalist. Here he is about to down his second Hank's Haute Dog (the Chicago) in under ten minutes.

Hank’s Haute Dogs: My husband loved this place so much, we went two days in a row. He gushed all over Chef Henry when we ran into him, professing that he liked it better than Alan Wong’s. I’m not sure I would go that far, but dollar for dollar, these were some awesome bites. The portugese sausage was covered in caramelized onions and a nice tart mustard, the Chicago was a visual delight covered in the traditional works; tomatoes, pickle spear, grainy mustard, pickled peppers and onions and homemade relish. I had the chicken, which is good choice for those who like a bit of sweetness in their sausage, covered in mustard and mango relish.  On all three, whether steamed or fried, the snap was right on from the first bite to the last. And oh, the sides. The french fries and accompanying dipping sauces are worth the trip alone (more on the that in the official Honolulu French Fry review to follow).  Locals lined up out the door during the lunch rush to cool off with a pineapple ice, while others happily walked in with liquor store bags to take advantage of the BYOB.

Char Hung Sut and Royal Kitchen: I am writing about these two places together because, in my family, they are a unit. We go to Char Hung Sut for Ma tai Su, then walk to Royal Kitchen to get boxes of Manapua to take back to California. There is much local debate over whether we have this backwards, so lets just say both places are venerated purveyors of bao of all kinds. The Ma Tai Su, which is smaller than manapua or traditional char siu ba (steamed pork dumplings), has a flaky, slightly sweet crust on top, with a crispy bottom. Inside is a blend of pork, mushrooms, water chestnuts and other savory veggies. Royal Kitchen’s baked manapua are better than their steamed, and come in lots of local favorite varieties, the best of which are the kahlua pork, black sugar and curry chicken.

The Pineapple Room's Kahlua Pork Hash Patty Loco Moco. It was so heavy and dense, the plate left an indentation in the table cloth. Delicious.

The Pineapple Room's Kahlua Pork Hash Patty Loco Moco. It was so heavy and dense, the plate left an indentation in the table cloth. Delicious.

The Pineapple Room: Sadly, the Pineapple room has had a fall from grace in recent years in terms of setting and service; both are a bit shabby. However, it’s still one of the tastiest lunch spots in Honolulu. I had a kahlua pork hash loco moco that was filled with the meatiest, smokiest pork I have ever tasted, and studded with big chunks of potato and taro. It was huge and heavy, and rested like Jabba the Hut on top of a bed of chicken and mushroom fried rice, surrounded by a moat of veal jus. It is almost unfair how delicious it was, because it was twice as much as the standard loco moco or pork hash you can get at other spots.  We also had the Kalbi style pork skewers (ok, but  bedded on a great slaw with kimchee) and an order of the Original Pineapple Room burger, which was good, but not very original.

Tonkatsu Ginza Bairn: This was the most disappointing meal I had, because I had very high expectations for $30 pork tonkatsu. This U.S. outpost of a small franchise in Tokyo does indeed have very crispy flaky tonkatsu and a decent homemade sauce, and some innovative preparations of tonkatsu that you may not be able to find elsewhere. But, somehow, the meal just tasted sort of flat and unexciting. For two people, lunch was $60, which I knew going in, but regretted on the way out.

Here's the $25 summer special Hiyashi Tonkatsu at Tonkatsu Ginza Bairn. Intriguing at first, but nothing was really flavorful enough to hold my attention.

Here's the $25 summer special Hiyashi Tonkatsu at Tonkatsu Ginza Bairn. Intriguing at first, but nothing was really flavorful enough to hold my attention.

The Makino Chaya Bento box is already a steal at $5.50. And it also comes with a $5.50 coupon to use at their seafood buffet on a later date, yowzah!

The Makino Chaya Bento box is already a steal at $5.50. And it also comes with a $5.50 coupon to use at their seafood buffet on a later date, yowzah!

Makino Chaya: Delicious bounty for $5.50! Makino Chaya makes 200 bento boxes each weekday for $5.50 a piece, and they often run out so it’s a good idea to call ahead and reserve yours. We picked up our boxes and found a shady spot in the grass of the Iolani Palace grounds, so that we could eat and enjoy the Royal Hawaiian Band’s weekly outdoor concert, and opened up our hefty treasures. The bentos contained over 15 different items, including a hearty serving of  misoyaki butterfish, salmon mixed rice, teri chicken thighs, nishimi, prawn tempura, hijiki seaweed salad, sweet green tea mochi, pickled vegetables, fried squid, smoked fishcakes, braised kabocha, tamago studded with ham, potstickers and on and on and on.

Honolulu Eats Part 2: Happy Happy Hour Dining

In Hawaii on June 17, 2009 at 4:50 am

One of the decisions we made in order to save money on our recent Honolulu trip was to eat dinner at happy hour. Normally, happy hour may conjure images of slurring young professionals downing bad calamari and $2 Red Stripes. Of course, there is plenty of that in Honolulu, but there are also some real dining gems as well.

Doraku Sushi: The Doraku Sushi happy hour edged out Brasserie Du Vin for me as the best dining happy hour on this trip. Conveniently located for tourists in the newly renovated Royal Hawaiian shopping center, this place was the least touristy sushi place I’ve been to in Waikiki. The 5-7 crowd was a mix of young hipsters and 30-40 something couples, filling the room with a quiet , entertained hum instead of the roar of other happy hours we tried. The menu was affordable and filled with great fresh fish items selected from the regular dinner menu. A modern interpretation of tuna tataki, a generous, piping hot bowl of chicken karaage and rice, drizzled with a little sesame sauce and something called the Geisha roll were all delicious and very very fresh. Other standouts included a great spread of tsukemono pickles and the greatest lychee martini I have ever had, garnished with a lychee that has been happily hibernating in vodka for a good long while. Every dish I just mentioned was less than $5, the lychee martinis and other drink specials were $3. For $35 we had five dishes and 7 drinks, but I think we got a few freebies from the very nice bartender. Dynamite.

Brasserie Du Vin: The atmosphere of this beautiful spot, both in the outdoor patio seating area and the indoor salon, is sophisticated and casual and filled with gleaming dark woods and copper accents. The happy hour menu is filled with a few dinner menu favorites at half-off, including the grilled fish of the day. We had a large serving of fresh opah, grilled and served over cannelini beans and greens, for $8. Not exactly the tourist prices many are accustomed to seeing on the Waikiki strip. The special cocktails also reflected the wide range of wines available at the bar and were equally affordable and delicious. Every Tuesday, the Brasserie hosts a wine tasting in their little cottage for private parties, and is a great value at $20 per person. Hosted by the restaurant’s master sommelier and a local wine vendor, the theme the night we participated was 7 generous pours of sparkling wines from several different regions. The price also includes a small cheese plate for each person, which we augmented with a charcuterie selection from the happy hour menu. Very good value if you love an informative and delicious tasting.

Sansei Sushi: Sansei’s original location on Maui is known as a family friendly, innovative sushi experience with a very popular early bird special menu from 530p-630p. The lines snake around the building for half off fresh, jumping-off-the plate-sushi specials and selected entrees. Same deal is on at the Waikiki location, with an additional Friday and Saturday night special. From 10p-1a the Waikiki location offers half off their sushi and appetizers menu, and a few specially priced drinks, and free karaoke. Whether you’re into the karaoke or not (no pressure to sing, and things are spread out enough that you can ignore it), the fresh sushi specials are wonderful and offer some flavor combinations you won’t find elsewhere, like the Kenny G, which is fresh shiromi sashimi drizzled with garlic, masago, ponzu and shiso. I love high quality fish even more when it is 50% off. We were there for three hours (my husband is into the karaoke, what can I do?) and our tab for 7 dishes and 5 drinks was about sixty dollars.

Rumfire: This modern, fairly new space at the Sheraton is right on the water and has the best live music of any of the spots we visited. This is not technically a good happy hour dining value, as they have only two food items on special (good fries and edamame) , but I thought I would mention it because it is lovely space and a nice place to relax at sunset with a glass of 50% off house wine. On a side note, we went two different times to see if service was any better the second time, and it wasn’t.  Other than the happy hour selections, menu prices were pretty steep.

We also visited Mai Tai Bar (a fun local favorite in the Ala Moana Center with a lively crowd, good prices and forgettable food), Yardhouse (why why why) and Giovanni’s Pastrami in the new Waikiki Beach Walk. If you’re looking for cheap beer, the last two are good choices, but eat before you go.

Pairings: Guava Juice and Green Mangoes

In Hawaii, Home Cookin' on June 16, 2009 at 5:19 am

Guava Coolers and Vermicelli Salad with Green Mangoes and Misoyaki Grilled Chicken

Guava Coolers and Vermicelli Salad with Green Mangoes and Misoyaki Grilled Chicken

I came home today with serious withdrawals from my trip to Oahu this past week. To cope with this phenomenon every year and keep myself from looking at real estate listings on Maui, I usually cook a lot of foods that remind me of my favorite aspects of Hawaiian cuisine. My trusty guide is usually a great book called Ethnic Foods of Hawaii by Ann Kondo Corum, which is part history of Hawaiian food, part cookbook.

Tonight, I really missed some of the wonderfully innovative tropical drinks I tried on this last trip, and I wanted to eat crisp and refreshing green mango to counteract the copious amounts of kahlua pork I’ve eaten in the last few days. I had my eye on this great guava juice I have and started conceiving a  meal from there. The guava juice, mixed with a coconut rum, vodka and a bit of mint syrup yielded a wonderfully light cooler. Sipping thoughtfully, I knew I had to grill something since I had a drink in hand. The vermicelli salad with green mangoes and misoyaki grilled chicken was a great blend of some of my favorite Hawaiian flavors, and a handful of mint from the garden tied it together with my guava cooler. Vietnamese cuisine definitely holds a place in the blend of ethnic influences that comprise Hawaiian cuisine, and misoyaki marinated fish and meats are a common fixture in local bento boxes . The slight sweetness of the miso marinade on the chicken was a nice counterpart to the saltiness of the nuoc cham. For a meal that started as an excuse to have a tropical drink, the combination of flavors turned into a great summer meal.If you don’t have jicama and green mango handy, this salad would also be great with cucumbers and pineapple instead.

Honolulu Eats Part 1: Breakfast

In Hawaii, Uncategorized on June 16, 2009 at 5:00 am
Oahu is calling...here's the view from our room at the 4star Hawaii Prince. At $70 a night on Priceline, why aren't you there already?

Oahu is calling...here's the view from our room at the 4star Hawaii Prince. At $70 a night on Priceline, why aren't you there already?

Many food-curious Californians eventually turn their minds to the great cuisines of Hawaii at one point or another, if only because it’s such an easily accessible paradise sometimes. We had been planning to spend a week in San Diego for our anniversary this year, but found that it would be much much cheaper to spend it in Hawaii, since the drop in tourism has forced airfares and hotel rates to record lows.  Not a hard decision for us, we go back to Hawaii just about every year. This time, we decided to forgo a car and stay completely focused on great eats in Honolulu, accessible on foot, or by one, drop-dead easy bus ride.  A few items we were especially  concentrating on were kahlua pork items (for me), French fries (for my husband) and happy hours (for both of us). There are too many amazing places to eat in Honolulu, let alone all of Oahu or Hawaii to hit in one trip, so I’ll post our highlights in sections in the next few days. To start, the most important meal of the day; BREAKFAST.

KCC Farmer’s Market: The Sat morning farmer’s market at the foot of Diamondhead has turned into an absolute zoo over the past few years, which is great for the farmers and small vendors, as well as eaters.  By 8am, it’s packed, good stuff like lychees and pineapple from Laiae began running out by 10a. Honestly, why pay for one of those $250/person restaurant sampling parties when the best of Hawaii is here every week? Hits: BBQ’d Abalone from the Big Island (best thing I ate the entire week, they are alive and kickin even on the grill), Kahlua Pork sliders on Taro bread from the KCC culinary students (I downed two), Organic Sorbet from Organica, Sea Asparagus Inari from Marine Agrifuture and Misoyaki Butterfish Bento from Ohana Seafoods. Also, lychee season is so short, so I did two laps  early on to find the best price and sweetest selection. Make sure when getting lychees, pineapple and other tourist-friendly fruits, that you are not getting hustled with something shipped in from other places.

This very nice man shucks the living abalones and throws them on the grill for you. As I watched kids tickle the live ones and giggle at their suprisingly quick movements, asked if I didn't think it was gross to see something moving and eat it minutes later. SIlly man.

This very nice man shucks the living abalones and throws them on the grill for you. As I watched kids tickle the live ones and giggle at their suprisingly quick movements, asked if I didn't think it was gross to see something moving and eat it minutes later. SIlly man.

The underside of a beautifully grilled abalone, moist, firm and chewy, the taste is something between a clam and a mussel. For $5 you get two, and add a little drop of soy sauce to bring out the flavors. Plated up in a nice restaurant in San Francisco or Tokyo, the same thing could cost you upwards of $40. Best deal at the market.

The underside of a beautifully grilled abalone, moist, firm and chewy, the taste is something between a clam and a mussel. For $5 you get two, and add a little drop of soy sauce to bring out the flavors. Plated up in a nice restaurant in San Francisco or Tokyo, the same thing could cost you upwards of $40. Best deal at the market.

Diamondhead Market & Grill: I went for a 3 mile run, then walked three miles in muggy heat to get to Diamondhead Grill for breakfast, and it was worth every single step. The Kahlua Pork hash patty had great crispy edges outside, moist shreds of pork, taro and potato inside. Well-seasoned, great gravy to rice to patty ratio. Was the best Hash patty I had for breakfast, although the kahlua pork hash patty I had for a late lunch at the Pineapple Room was even better.  Loco Moco was ok, fairly standard, but I thought the gravy on it was excellent. Piping Hot Peets coffee (kicked up with our mini-Baileys and Kahlua liquer rations) from the hot pot was a great way to finish the meal with a blueberry cream cheese scone.

Egg’s N’ Things: This venerable local institution has a great new location that has completely converted me from my previous opinion that Eggs N’ Things is for tourists and the cranky waiters who fleece them. Two beautiful open floors on Saratoga are now filled with a waitstaff that I would swear is exponentially more cheerful, and the specials are newly delicious. Sweet bread French toast is always a good hit here, we had them one day with sweet dark cherries, another time with pineapple and macadamia nuts. You can order Portugese sausage just about anywhere in Hawaii, but the brand they are using here is well-flavored and cooked just enough to get crispy edges without drying out. Corned Beef hash patty was respectable.

The Shorebird: We’ve always gone to the Shorebird for two reasons: the price and the view. The coupons everyone talks about are real, and will get you a decent breakfast buffet for less than $10/person. More importantly, sipping coffee and munching pineapple right on the water in early morning Waikiki is priceless, and as long as you get here before tour buses begin unloading around 830a, that’s exactly the seat you will have.  Steer clear of all the baked goods and French toasts. I usually load up on fresh papaya (other places charge about $5-8 for “local delight” which is a papaya cut in half).

Legend Seafood Restaurant: Believe the hype, Legend Seafood is, well, legendary. But, the numbering system helps people move in and out pretty reasonably, we arrived at 1p for brunch and waited about ten minutes for a table for 8 (just enough time to load up on manapua). Dim Sum is my family’s favorite Sunday brunch option, and Legend delivers. Like all good dim sum places, leave your meekness and inhibitions at the door, the best dishes go to those who advocate for themselves and wave down the carts. The jook was well-garnished with meat, green onions and great little crispies. Also good was a taro-pork dumpling that is covered in a crispy sort of web, wonderful marriage of flavors you will not find outside of Hawaii. Best pork siu mai I have ever had in Hawaii,  apparently we weren’t the only ones who felt that way, it was the hardest dish to procure.

As you can tell, at Legend Seafood I could not take the pictures fast enough. Within seconds of landing on the table, delights like these pictured (Haupia Egg Custard, Standard egg Custard, Baked Char Siu Bao, Jook, Pork Siu Mai, Shrimp dumplings) disappeared.

As you can tell, at Legend Seafood I could not take the pictures fast enough. Within seconds of landing on the table, delights like these pictured (Haupia Egg Custard, Standard egg Custard, Baked Char Siu Bao, Jook, Pork Siu Mai, Shrimp dumplings) disappeared.

Leonard’s: I don’t want to bag on Leonard’s, I have enjoyed a plain malassada here on occasion, though I believe Agnes’ in Kailua to be the best. However, this time I was talked into a malassada with filling  (I have always assumed these are for tourists, I’ve never met a local who recommended them….) and tried the haupia, coconut, mango and custard. Personally, I felt like I was imbibing spoonfuls of corn syrup. I felt so ill the rest of the day I had to skip lunch. Proceed with caution, stick with the oldies but goodies.

Sure, they look delicious and they smell like heaven. Here's hoping the malassada deities smile on me next time around.

Sure, they look delicious and they smell like heaven. Here's hoping the malassada deities smile on me next time around.

Stay tuned for the next installment….Honolulu Eats Part 2:  Best Happy Hours for A Really Good, Really Cheap Dinner